• By Cliff Mail

Is the tide starting to turn?

A few snippets of good news from the frontlines in the climate battle.

Major infrastructure projects may need to start considering climate impacts: Heathrow Airport's plans to increase capacity of Europe's biggest travel hub by over 50% were stalled Thursday when a British court said the government failed to consider its commitment to combat climate change when it approved the project. Should NZ be considering this before it embarks on it's major roading spend?

Keeping it in the ground: We’re celebrating some major wins against the fossil fuel industry from around the world over the past week.

In Canada’s tar sands region, the largest ever proposed open-pit mine has been shelved, thanks to people power. The company, Teck Resources, said itself that uncertainty over climate policy and protest in Canada convinced them to pull out. Historic resistance has come from Indigenous Climate Action, 350 Canada and many other groups: they’re pushing for the fallout to make space for a Green New Deal. In the Philippines, a new ban on all new coal-fired power station projects in the province of Antique has passed after years of anti-coal protests in the region. The provincial board said the ban was because of the damaging effects of coal to communities’ health.

What would've been Latin America’s largest open-pit coal mine was stopped by a federal court Friday, thanks to a diverse campaign of marches, public education and advocacy. The court said the coal company’s failure to consult the local Indigenous population was a key factor. Now family farmers, Indigenous communities, and fishers as well as the 4.5 million people of the nearby state capital, Porto Alegre, are safe from its threats. A whopping 4.5 gigatons of CO₂ will be avoided over the mine’s lifetime.

People power is working, and it’s all thanks to you! These are big, important wins that keep fossil fuels where they belong – in the ground. Read on for more inspiring stories from around the globe.

100% renewables: Thousands of people across Ukraine are telling the government its plan for the energy transition doesn't go far enough. On Friday outside the Ministry for Energy and Mining, a coalition of youth demanded a national plan for 100% renewable energy by 2050, and an end to new coal mines which harm communities on the frontlines of extraction. Clean seas: The Austrian oil company OMV has pulled the plug and stopped its controversial deep-sea drill off the coast of Aotearoa New Zealand, after failing to find oil. Days later, Equinor (formerly Statoil) announced they wouldn’t drill in the pristine waters of the Great Australian Bight, sparking more celebrations from activists who’ve been fighting for its protection.

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